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Utah Leave Laws

laws

Vacation

No federal or state law requires employers to provide paid or unpaid vacation time for their employees. However, if employers choose to offer a vacation leave, paid or unpaid, to their employees it must comply with applicable state law or employment contract. 

Jury Duty Leave

Employers must allow employees unpaid leave to respond to a jury summons, serve as a juror or grand juror, or attend court for prospective jury service. An employer may not threaten or take adverse employment action against an employee who takes leave for jury duty. Also, an employer may not require an employee to use annual, vacation, or sick leave to cover the time spent responding to a jury summons, participating in the selection process, or serving on a jury.

Bereavement Leave

No federal or state law require an employer to provide the employee with paid or unpaid bereavement leave or with any time off to organize or attend a close family member’s funeral.

Voting Leave

Employers must allow employees two hours of paid leave to vote on an election day if the employee applied for leave prior to the election day. However, leave is not available to an employee whose work schedule allows for three or more hours of non-work time when the polls are open. Employers may specify the hours during which the employee may leave to vote. If the employee requests the leave at the beginning or end of their work shift, the employer must grant that request.

Reserve Member of the Armed Forces Leave

Utah law provides the following job protections for members of a reserve component of the U.S. armed forces, in addition to Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act:

  • Reserve members must be granted leave due to U.S. active duty, training or state active duty for no more than five years.
  • Reemployment upon satisfactory release with the seniority, status, pay and vacation the employee would have had if not absent for military purposes